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Printful’s Road To a $1 Billion Valuation, with Head of Marketing Raitis Purins

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There is no shortage of ecommerce companies popping up everywhere you look, especially in the U.S, where the culture of having a side hustle is making more and more people into entrepreneurs. Most of those companies sell products, and a lot of them also create or sell merch. That’s where Printful comes into the picture. Printful offers on-demand printing and dropshipping so that companies of all shapes and sizes can design and deliver customized products all over the world. But, according to Raitis Purins, the Head of Marketing of Printful, that’s not the main aspect of the company that has allowed it to grow to a $1 billion valuation.

On this episode of Up Next in Commerce, Raitis explains that when it comes to serving burgeoning ecommerce brands, you have to do more than deliver products to them, you have to help educate them. Printful is only successful if the companies it serves survive and thrive, and so when 9 out of 10 new ecommerce businesses fail, that could spell trouble. Raitis explained that a lot of what Printful does is create content that not only helps the company rank on Google and bring in new customers, but also helps those customers figure out their footing in this crazy world of business. Enjoy this episode!

Main Takeaways:

  • Side Hustles As Printful’s Main Hustle: Thanks to the culture of side hustles in the United States, there are more creators and entrepreneurs than ever before who all need merchandise. This audience is a fruitful place for companies like Printful and other personalization brands to lean into and deliver new products for.
  • Encouraging Success: It is extremely difficult to create an ecommerce shop that stands the test of time. Success is hard to come by, and so if you serve those young brands, it benefits you to try to help them succeed. When they thrive, so do you, so if you have tips, best practices, or other lessons that you can share with those who come work with you, sharing what you know will create a mutually beneficial, and therefore loyal, relationship.
  • Content, Content, Content: No one knows exactly what it takes to rank on Google, but there is consensus that content is king, and developing content around key themes, key words, and key phrases is one method that has worked before. In order to stay relevant and ranking, constantly be pushing out content around the keywords you identify as important, and build out that content in as many ways and languages as possible.

For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.

Key Quotes:

 

“In my wildest dreams, I didn’t think that I would be in this position five years after, a billion dollar worth valuation, a hundred people on the marketing team. Pretty insane.”

“The main goal is challenging the team to their next goal so that we are on top of the level of what we’re actually doing. Because you have to constantly challenge yourself.” 

“It was much more complicated five, 10 years ago that you had to basically contact the guy, get a merch, and then invest some money. Now the only thing you need is just your computer. And you can start selling anything you want in any place of the world, almost. By just having an idea, you can test it. If it’s not going to work, lost your time. If it works, we can scale up to a thousand items, as you wish.”

“It’s trying to find audience, maybe which are very often beginners who could potentially be interested. And we are doing that with ads, influencers, affiliated marketing. So we are also spending pretty big money on Google ads, on Facebook, Instagram ads to actually find and continue growing. But that’s actually the easiest part, to find those customers and then comes the challenge to onboard them. Because for you to start an e-commerce store, it’s not like to buy something online from a mobile phone. A lot of decisions has to be made, starting with your niche. What do you want to sell? Do you have designs? Those are even the basic questions. And that’s why we invest a lot of resource in actually educating them, creating YouTube content, blog content, and putting that in front of them at the right time during their onboarding flow. So that’s the main challenge for us.

“No one knows how you can actually rank on Google. So you have to come up with the great content. And these days, we have our top keywords we want to rank for, and we actively optimize our webpage, our blog article by creating more content about it.” 

“Usually when you mention influencers, you think about Instagram and then pretty images there. So we have tested that, but it’s really hard to measure that and see the result. In our case, the best working influencer is the ecommerce influencer, the person who creates those YouTube videos, educating content about how you can launch your side hustle, launch your business…The most successful are those who actually educate their audience and then guide them through the process of how to launch their store. And those are the influencers we want to work with, and we have seen the best success in the past.”

Bio

Raitis Purins is the Head of Marketing at Printful, where he led the winning marketing strategy and execution and scaled the marketing team from 5 to 50 people. He is responsible for content marketing, SEO, PPC, CRO, PR and affiliate marketing.. He has previous experience in sports journalism and marketing, and is based in Latvia.


Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we’re ready for what’s next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce

 

Transcript:

Stephanie:

Hello and welcome back to Up Next in Commerce. I’m your host, Stephanie Postles, CEO at Mission.org. Today on the show, we have Raitis Purins, who currently serves as a head of marketing for Printful. Raitis, welcome.

Raitis:

Welcome. Glad to be on the show.

Stephanie:

Me too. I love that we’re in completely opposite time zones right now, but somehow we made it work. Where are you calling from in the world?

Raitis:

I’m calling from Europe, from a pretty small country, Riga Latvia. So less than two million citizens, population. But used to working with the U.S., so it’s not something uncommon if we are doing that. It’s not that I’m doing it for the first time.

Stephanie:

Good. Well, I’m glad you’re here. So I want to hear a bit about your background. Before you came to Printful, what were you doing before then?

Raitis:

So I’m being into the marketing for already more than 10 years. And do you want to go before the marketing as well? How long do you want to go back?

Stephanie:

I would go back to age zero, but we won’t today. But we can start with how you got involved in marketing.

Raitis:

So I’ve always been passionate about journalism, so I was into the writing. So I even started my own blog in 2004. Who knew that it will be one of the marketing strategies these days. But I had my own blog. I think I was 16. So I just wanted to practice writing. That was only the way. There was no social media. But 10 years ago I lost my previous job, and I was one of the first social media marketers, 10 years ago. And I think just Facebook was around, maybe Twitter, but no one can understand if you want to start social media now, which channels you should use.

Raitis:

And back then I’m still joking around. The social media surgie was you come to the office and you think, “Oh, what will I post today?” So that was the social media surgie back then. And it wasn’t super exciting. So I was a media planner. I planned Facebook ads and other local ads for different media channels. And my last position before joining Printful, I was at the local telecom company. I was media and digital manager. So playing around with big budgets for the local market, but nothing you would compare with international company like Printful as now.

Stephanie:

Cool. So tell me a bit about what drew you to Printful, because everything I’m reading, it’s like scaling like crazy. It’s I think over 800 employees now. It’s getting a lot of revenue every single month. So what drew you there? When did you join?

Raitis:

It’s crazy. I will celebrate my fifth birthday this year. So Printful is eight years old. So I joined the team when the marketing team was just five people. So prior me, CEO managed the marketing team and I was the first head of marketing. I joined with this title, but of course, I was project manager. And what drew me to Printful, it’s email from the CEO. So fun story, he read my blog. So actually blog helped me get this job, but Latvia’s a small country. So he was looking for someone who could join his team.

Raitis:

So he knew people, I knew people, and one email, one to you and I’m here. Probably in my wildest dreams, I didn’t think that I will be this position five years after, a billion dollar worth valuation, a hundred people on the marketing team. Pretty insane. I didn’t think about that.

Stephanie:

So what does it look like today? I’m just imagining the world back then when you joined and what your tasks were like when you were the first head of marketing to now with a hundred people. What did it look like then and what does it look like now?

Raitis:

Now probably I can be head of marketing, and back then it was just a title. And honestly, I was a marketing project manager, as the best. And actually I was any project manager.

Raitis:

And the main goal is challenging the team to their next goal so that we are on top of the level what we’re actually doing. Because you have to constantly challenge yourself. And as I’m saying that I’m real manager, that I can take a vacation for one, two months and nothing will going to change, but you will start to miss me after a while. So we should find Raitis. So that’s my job now. Back then I was actually a project manager.

Stephanie:

Cool. So earlier we were talking about platforms and what it used to be like when you were managing social media, but today, there are so many channels that you can get on. And I know you’ve written a bit about Tik Tok and the engagement that you’ve seen on that platform. And I want to hear a bit more about what platforms are you exploring right now, and what are you seeing success with?

Raitis:

So great question. There’s so many platforms that you don’t know actually with who to start. So we can always go basic as … Still, Instagram is our best performing social media channel through terms of actually social media. But you can also look on the social media in terms of the ads, where still Facebook, Instagram is the king from our perspective. So there will always be some shared deals about the channels, which will always work.

Raitis:

That’s a good starting package, but then you should always test new channels so you can learn about new channels. You will never know, is it going to work for you or not. We played around with Tik Tok. We’re still not active there, but we play on the ads and we learn a lot there. So we’re still figuring out the channel, if that’s really the audience which we want to work with. And very often the problem is that it’s basically just mobile. And try to just launch your e-commerce store using just your mobile phone. You should better use desktop, and that’s one of the platforms. I know that most of the people still use mobile.

Raitis:

So it’s always about testing your channels. Playing even with a Clubhouse. We don’t know what will come up in a couple of years.

Stephanie:

I can see probably a big wave of people wanting to use you now, especially with so many entrepreneurs starting businesses, starting new DTC companies. What inbound have you had around this new rise of everyone’s starting a company or a brand or trying to launch a product?

Raitis:

So we are in a pretty great place in terms of that. So that’s probably also why we are so successful. Basically, this times, we love to use side hustling. It’s a thing in the U.S. It’s much more a thing than, for example, in Europe. We are now localizing also our website in a couple of languages. And we can’t use the same methods as we did in the U.S. And it’s side hustling, but it’s also that so many new creators is made. And it’s, again, thanks to social media that you can create content, but again, you create an audience. You can want to sell the merch to that audience.

Raitis:

And that also is helping us. And it was much more complicated five, 10 years ago that you had to basically contact the guy, get a merch, and then invest some money. Now the only thing you need is just your computer. And you can start selling anything you want in any place of the world, almost. By just having an idea, you can test it. If it’s not going to work, lost your time. If it works, we can scale up to a thousand items, as you wish. Basically no limits for that.

Stephanie:

How are you finding these new customers, especially in an environment right now that I see as very competitive? To me, you guys were the first where you were the first ones who really let a business owner go on and be like, “Here’s my design. I want to order this,” and just felt so easy. But now when you look around, it seems like there’s a lot of companies trying to compete in this space. So how do you tailor your marketing message to these new potential customers in a way that’s going to pull them to Printful instead of a competitor?

Raitis:

So we were probably a little bit lucky at the beginning. So still, our number one priority is performance marketing. So very often people find us by Google.

Stephanie:

Just through SEO.

Raitis:

Through SEO. And we are a pretty grateful place. At the start, we were lucky, but now we are still continuing to invest more and more resources into that. So we are answer to people questions online. So that’s a magical place to be in. And still people phone to us. So SEO still, I’m saying is the king, but there is some limits. So if you want to continue growing, you have to look in other directions as well.

Raitis:

And these days, of course, it’s trying to find audience, maybe which are very often beginners who could potentially be interested. And we are doing that with ads, influencers, affiliated marketing. So we are also spending pretty big money on Google ads, on Facebook, Instagram ads to actually find and continue growing. But that’s actually the easiest part, to find those customers and then comes the challenge to onboard them. Because for you to start an e-commerce store, it’s not like to buy something online from a mobile phone. A lot of decisions has to be made, starting with your niche. What do you want to sell? Do you have designs? Those are even the basic questions.

Raitis:

And that’s why we invest a lot of resource in actually educating them, creating YouTube content, blog content, and putting that in front of them at the right time during their onboarding flow. So that’s the main challenge for us. Not otherwise, it’s the harsh reality that nine out of 10 customers will fail. They were never to the place that you will launch successful e-commerce. So you can launch it. Maybe mom or dad will buy it, your friends, but that’s not the goal. Don’t make that your mom or dad is your only customer.

Stephanie:

To unpack that a bit, I want to go back to SEO, because you’ll probably talk to a lot of commerce companies, and that’s something that everyone wants, but don’t really know how to figure it out. If you’re early, that’s one thing, but then also creating good pieces of content and answering questions like you said. Where are you answering these questions and how are you thinking about creating engaging content that keeps you up high in the rankings? A big question. You can think about it.

Raitis:

That’s really a good question. And at this time, we were lucky. So we were writing about topics which maybe there were not so much information about it, because no one knows how you can actually rank on Google. So you have to come up with the great content. And these days, we have our top keywords we want to rank for, and we actively optimize our webpage, our blog article by creating more content about it. Also, some link building in it as well.

Raitis:

And then we are looking at, hey, where can we provide more value? So about what can we write additional article about, or maybe landing page with potential. And then we just create it and that constantly repeating again and again. Another thing, there’s much less competition in other languages. So Printful now is available in eight languages. And that’s also one of the strategies. Why we are launching new language is to get more people to our website, because it’s not such a big competition as in English language to acquire more customers.

Raitis:

Of course, interest is not there yet. And I even don’t know how it’s print in demand in other languages, but something we are also actively investing in. And that’s one of the cornerstones. For example, we have our basic package to launch in your language. It’s still content marketers. This started actually our localizers or translators, plus the SEO person. So we hit the right keyboards from the beginning when we launched the website. So we get the maximum effect out of it.

Stephanie:

Got it. And how many pieces of content are you putting out every week or every month? What does it look like to stay relevant?

Raitis:

A lot. So for example, for the blog, we have two pieces a week in English, and one content per language as well. So that’s the minimum. Very often it’s optimization. So we created content a while ago and now we invest time to update it. And we actually created our own in-house landing page generator. Otherwise, as everything is custom made at printful.com, so it took us a lot of resources, designers, developers to launch the page.

Raitis:

So I think we launch a couple of landing pages every week now, if we count other languages, because it’s easy to do. But now we are going back to the audit, looking back, “Okay, what can we improve?” And it’s not just about SEO. Probably, the easiest part is rank on different keywords, but when it comes to converting the user who visits your website. So that’s another piece where you have to invest your time as well, making sure that you get the visitor to your website, and actually he does what you actually want him to do. Creates an account and then launch his store.

Raitis:

So I have a great SEO team, and they understand that they have to invest also in conversion rate as well, not just getting the traffic. There’s no value about that.

Stephanie:

And I always think it’s smart when I see companies having me design something first and getting invested in it where I’m like, “Ah, there’s my beautiful t-shirt or my blanket.” And then they’re like, “Okay, are you ready to order? Now you need to get an account.” Something that pulls me in and what feels like a pretty easy conversion to trying it out, seeing what it looks like, what the experiences might be like. And then it’s pretty instant to want to convert to buy it and have a paid account. Is that how you guys think about things? Are you testing a bunch of different funnels?

Raitis:

It’s the readiness, and which stage people come to the website, they’re totally, totally different. And not always you have a design that you want to put on the product. And in our now corner pieces, we’re also investing a lot of resource. Other teams are investing on design making so that we actually fix this problem that anyone with even minimum design knowledge can come up with a beautiful design which they want to put their shirt or a phone case. So that’s one thing.

Raitis:

And we try to engage them. So first of all, we try to sell the idea. It’s easy, but when you actually start doing that, because if you want to launch a store, it’s not just enough with one design. So we try to motivate them, keep them engaged. So we launched a loyalty program as well, that you do something, we reward with points. And that you don’t want to leave us and you’re still continuing investing. Another thing is, for example, we also have sample orders.

Raitis:

So if you can’t get into the people inboxes with your email marketing, because people have to opt in for that, maybe it’ll get in your mailbox with the sample order after that. So somehow to remind them about us in the different stages to keep them interested. Because still, you’re saying correctly, you can interest the people with time, but you have to have something to put on. Have to have some idea.

Stephanie:

On the high intent ready-to-buy user who already has my designs, ready to put them on, already know what I want, but what seems to be an interesting challenge … I don’t know. I’m sure you guys think about it too. Earlier, you were talking about nine out of 10 businesses fail, and what does that look like afterwards? And I’m just thinking about, how do you think about optimizing for lifetime value of that customer, also knowing the odds are not in many people’s favor when they’re launching a new business? How do you guys think about what happens after that, they’ve launched their first store, they’re trying to sell, maybe they don’t get it in front of a bunch of people. Do you all even have a way where you come after the fact and try and support?

Raitis:

I would like to be an Etsy, because then I could just put some money into that and get people to buy from the seller, but I’m not. So we are a white-label company. So maybe you even ordered something from us. You have no idea that it came from Printful. It came from that small merch. And how we are helping them is pushing them, educating them. Very often, the marketing team teaches others how to do marketing. Offer different Google coupons, Adword coupons for them to actually try to do something with the marketing there.

Raitis:

But that’s the hardest part. And my suggestion to anyone who are getting just started … So I believe the best combination that you get someone who understand how internet works, and you get an artist, and you put that together, you can launch a successful store. Because then there comes a challenge to get someone to their website who are interested in buying that product for that particular price and the design as well. So that’s the hardest challenge, and it’s not easy.

Stephanie:

We used you guys on our website. It was essentially like that. We had our store, and it did look very much … It was white-label. It looked like mission stuff. Every time someone would order, it would be drop shipped to them. It worked beautifully. And the whole time, I was just wondering, how did they do this? How do they ship to someone in Europe, to someone in California and just it all works so seamlessly? So I want to hear the behind the scenes there of how do you think about logistics and fulfillment? How do you get everything to work so nicely?

Raitis:

When someone ask about this, I’m saying that it’s because of developers. And it’s that developers learned or basically learned themselves how to print something on a t-shirt without leaving their computer.

Stephanie:

There we go. All right. Now we know that was the secret.

Raitis:

But in reality is a lot, a lot of people in the fulfillment facilities, I think now we have already nine fulfillment centers globally. And I know that some of them are still in the process to be opened in the next couple of months, but that’s learning by doing. We started small and we’re just constantly investing more and more resources in development, because we have a team of more than a hundred developers. And a lot of them works with printers, with stock ordering.

Raitis:

We even have our own warehousing app, where if you order something from Printful, you will see who picked the shirt. There’ll be name written, who checked the quality and who shipped it. So we can follow all the details. And that’s something you also can see. I know how much time she or he spent on the process, and we can constantly optimize that. And there comes different challenges. And that’s easy to be team operations, because they constantly have to understand, do we have enough orders? Do we have enough people to fulfill the orders? So that’s their challenge.

Raitis:

My goal is to bring as much volume as they can. And that’s too much as well. So that was also challenge last year, when e-commerce improvement. And for a couple of months, we did anti-marketing even. Anti-marketing, less orders for the operations team. Otherwise, some people had to wait for two months actually to get a t-shirt.

Stephanie:

So what kind of shakeups did you experience over the last year? And did you make changes that are going to be go forward changes, or was it more just like a hiccup in time and now you’re back to operating as you did?

Raitis:

It allowed to scale their business a lot. Because at the start, of course it went down and we didn’t understand why. And with all the restrictions in place, I think in one week, my team shut down both facilities in the U.S., because non-essential businesses were not able to work. And then as people understood what’s happening, demand went up. And then we had to figure out how can we fulfill all those incoming orders with limited resources as well.

Raitis:

So what we did, we stopped all the ads marketing, because people found us natural, organically. But for a couple of months, we didn’t even spend a dime on performance marketing, because we didn’t need the volume. So we had to be much more careful. And what we did, again, it was parity before as well, but we started more focusing on other markets besides the U.S., where maybe station was a little bit more stable and we were able to get more volume.

Raitis:

So we just changed their mindset to different markets as well. So how can we rank for more keywords in Canada and in Spain, in Germany. And that probably, again is the same story. Let’s not keep all the eggs in the same basket. So how can we differentiate the risks from different perspectives. And that we are constantly keeping in mind. If there’s even now a facility shutdown in California, do we have another printer also in Charlotte who can also print the same products? So that probably is just one learning to stay.

Stephanie:

When it comes to consumer preferences, what does it look like from your customers in Germany versus … The U.S., it seems probably pretty obvious of what people want from you guys, but do you see different preferences from people in Europe or anywhere else you sell around the world?

Raitis:

So from product perspective, still the t-shirt. Still the go-to product. It’s how people understand and how people usually start. So there’s not major difference in terms of that. Probably from how people use us. And more in the U.S., they start their own business. So they started their own side hustle. But often Europe, how I have seen that, that they monetize their existing business or audience. For example, Japan is a totally different market.

Raitis:

They even launch their merch line for their bar or something like that. So it’s super strange. I believe they will sooner … I know they will never let their own job and start their own side hustles. So that’s not the goal for them. So different reasons why they’re looking for something like this. And we want to encourage more people to start their own business, especially artists, which has the design. Just learn how to basically monetize your art and sell to that audience.

Stephanie:

That seems like a good challenge. Thinking about places like Japan, how do you showcase them maybe resources or content that does encourage them to be a little risky, like you still don’t have to leave your job, but you can maybe try something out? Because there are a lot of artists there, but it definitely feels like a different vibe of what are they willing to do to maybe take a risk. Spend a little bit of money and see if someone will buy it. What are you guys doing to help nudge that a bit of like, everyone can start a business?

Raitis:

It’s a learning curve. So first of all, they have to trust us as well. So that’s also a huge thing. And for example, in Japan, also in Germany, it’s also a thing that they should trust us, otherwise they will not give us their business. So in Japan, we’re still looking for the answer, how can we do that. So we are there. If someone’s searching for us, they will find us, but not enough people are searching for that.

Raitis:

So that working with influencers, working more on brand marketing as well, not so much on the awareness. So generally playing all the YouTube ads, letting more people know about that, who could potentially be interested in us. And learning Japanese UX UI. If you will open our first page in Japanese, it look totally different than any other language. But that’s something that’s required for Japanese audience, for us to be relevant to them.

Stephanie:

That’s an interesting challenge to think about how to approach that. You’ve mentioned influencers a couple of times, and I want to hear how you guys are exploring those partnerships. What does it look like? I’d love to hear behind the scenes there.

Raitis:

So usually when you mentioned influencers, you think about Instagram and then pretty images there. So we have tested that, but it’s really hard to measure that and see the result. In our case, the best working influencer is e-commerce influencer, the person who creates those YouTube videos, educating content about how you can launch your side hustle, launch your business. And also, our affiliate programs helping with that.

Raitis:

And it’s not just you could be our affiliate and just put a link on social media, “Hey, here’s Printful, started their own store.” And usually don’t the most successful are those who actually educate their audience and then guide them through the process of how to launch their store. And those are the influencers we want to work with, and we have seen the best success in the past. And that’s a combination of influencers actively reaching out to them.

Stephanie:

Oh, that’s more of the how to … Like someone who’s looking for, how do I actually start a business? What website do I use? The really nitty-gritty influencers who maybe aren’t the biggest ones, but the people who are talking through exactly how to do it. And then at a certain point, they’re going to say, and if you want swag, you would use Printful or-

Raitis:

Yeah. It’s not the famous people who we see on TV. It’s those who are smart and then you get the others. So maybe they have a Facebook group. Maybe they have a YouTube following, and they create content about not their log live, but something specific. So those we see the most success.

Stephanie:

So I have one more question for you before we get into the lightning round. It’s where do you see Printful headed over the next one to three years? What are you guys aiming for?

Raitis:

So constantly I’m onboarding my team. And in Latvia, you have to think small because the market is small. But I have to mind always that for Printful, sky’s the limit, because we’re a global company. And I’m saying that we have a valuation of a billion dollars, but we can be also a billion dollar company in terms of revenue. So that’s the goal. And in some way, we want to be next Amazon for on demand. So that’s what can we together achieve as a team in the future.

Stephanie:

I love that. It’s a good goal. All right. Next up is the lightning round. The lightning round is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. This is where I ask you a question and you have a minute or less to answer. Are you ready?

Raitis:

Yes.

Stephanie:

All right. What’s one thing you’re secretly curious about?

Raitis:

I’m curious about superpowers. There will be ever people able to fly, and a little bit of the Harry Porter-

Stephanie:

I like that. That’s good. I love Harry Porter too, so I’m not going hate on that. That’s good. What is your favorite marketing advice that you give to other people?

Raitis:

I very often hear people say that from different teams that, I don’t have a good budget. Of course, you have to invest something into marketing because you will not see the return of your ad spend or marketing spend on the next day, but you have to show how marketing is helping achieve company’s goal. How you’re measuring that, that you show that, “Hey, my boss, let’s invest more into marketing, and you will see how it will bring more sales.” So you have to show how your marketing team is helping your company achieve their goals.

Stephanie:

Love that. If you were to have a podcast, what would it be about?

Raitis:

About successful stories, e-commerce stories. Because one of the things we allow on working in my team, helping people achieve their goals. Because we are solving some problem to that, and I’m not just selling something bad. So I love to see how we might get a good product and then hear how they succeed with that. So that’s great, and I would like to hear more about that.

Stephanie:

I love that. All right. And then what’s one piece of advice that was given to you that you always remember? It can be business or personal.

Raitis:

I have learned so much in the past years that even I don’t know what I learned on myself or from others. Like feedback, it’s something probably I learned on my own. And feedback is important in any basically relationship with the loved ones, my wife, or at work. So you have to talk and you have to provide feedback. By talking, anything will happen just fast and quicker and you’ll not have to basically guess. I love the example that those socks stay there. I know they’re staying there for one week and then my wife would look and wants me to understand that. But you can just say that and it’ll be just much easier. That’s also in a job. Just talk about your problems, about things which aren’t happening.

Stephanie:

That’s great. All right. Raitis, this has been an awesome interview. Thank you for taking the time at the end of your day. Where can people find out more about you and Printful?

Raitis:

Printful.com, easy, or just search and Google Printful and you can find me on Twitter, Instagram, and also just add me on LinkedIn. I love to brag about my company, so learn a lot about Printful there.

Stephanie:

Amazing. Thanks so much.

Raitis:

Thanks. It was a blast.

Episode 148