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EPISODE 22

A Formula For Ecommerce Success

With Andrew Faris, the CEO of 4×400

What is the right percent profit margin you should target for your products? How do you get the most out of your Facebook ad buys? How much should you really pay attention to conversion rate? These are just a few of the questions that every small business and Ecommerce shop wants the answers to.

On this episode of Up Next in Commerce, we picked the brain of Andrew Faris, the CEO of 4×400, a company that has helped grow numerous Ecommerce companies from less than 500,000 into the tens of millions. Today, Andrew spills some of his advertising secrets, including how to make Facebook your core driver for customer acquisition. Here’s a mini spoiler: human bias is leading you astray, but there is a simple way to correct course. Find out that, and more, on this episode!

Key Takeaways:

  • Conversion rate is so context-specific that it’s not that helpful of a metric. Instead, analyze conversion rate relative to average order value and relative to the traffic sources the customer came from.
  • Before you invest in anything else, you need to drive traffic to the top of the funnel. Currently, Facebook ads are the core driver of customer acquisition for online shopping. Andrew suggests that most Ecommerce brands should invest in the platform and then trust the algorithm to put you in front of the right audiences.
  • You have to take big swings with your experiments. Don’t get hung up on micro-details like the color of your buttons or rewriting your copy. Instead, find big ways to make changes and then see how the outcomes stack up.
  • Because we are all riddled with our own biases, we often cannot predict accurate models of the future on our own. Instead, use data as your guide as you peer into the future

For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.

Key Quotes:

“One of [the trends we’re seeing] is that large corporations who have diversity of sales channels, but were spending lots of money on advertising, pulled their advertising budgets the way the heck back….And then at the same time in the last couple months, conversion rates on websites went up because the only place to capture demand was online.”

“Facebook ads are still the most powerful tool in the world for reaching people. I’m hearing chatter about other things …but for us, that’s the core, top of the funnel way that we get traffic to our website.”  

“Focus on being clear in your creative before you focus on being clever or funny, or any of those kinds of things. You can drive a lot of very cheap traffic to your website with Clickbait tactics, but they won’t buy anything.”

“Give Facebook as much information as possible and let Facebook’s algorithm predict the future for you because humans are terrible at predicting the future. Algorithms do a really good job of looking at the data set of who’s responding to your advertising [and putting your ad in front of more people like that].”

“Every business in the world only has three factors that make up the value that you get from a purchase, or that make up your revenue. … How many people get [to your business], how many of those people buy and how much do they spend when they do? That’s the entirety that makes up the revenue. That’s incredibly simple and intuitive in a lot of ways. But what I find is that in the fog of war, people lose sight of that very simple concept.”

“If you’re going to try and grow a brand with Facebook ads, you’re going to need to be able to exist at a two to one return on your money. It’s hard to really beat that number.”

“Think about this all like poker, which is to say that good poker players don’t win by winning a hand, they win by playing lots of hands really well …Get really good at understanding something like visitors and conversion rate times average order value and asking the right questions about that. Get really good at following your profit margins everywhere you can. Get as much clarity about them as you possibly can that way you know where your money is going and where you’re making money and where you’re not. If you can do those things over a long period of time you will win.”

Mentions:

Bio:

Andrew Faris is the CEO of 4×400, a holding company that launches and grows ECommerce brands. Prior to assuming the role of CEO at 4×400, Andrew served as the VP of Growth at the Common Thread Collective and as the Customer Acquisition Supervisor at QALO.

Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we’re ready for what’s next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce

Transcript:

Stephanie:

Hey everyone. This is Stephanie Postles, co-founder of Mission.org and your host of Up Next in Commerce. Today on the show, we have the CEO of 4×400, Andrew Faris. Andrew, thanks for taking the time.

Andrew:

Stephanie, I am very glad to be able to do this. I have never been accused of not liking to talk about Ecommerce in particular, but just in general. So this is fun.

Stephanie:

Well, you’re my perfect guest then. I was creeping as one does on your LinkedIn. I saw an interesting thing that you have a background in religion and theology. I was wondering how you transitioned into the world of business from that background.

Andrew:

Yeah. I can always tell when somebody has looked at my LinkedIn or not because that’s maybe the only place where that’s found anymore.

Stephanie:

You’re welcome.

Andrew:

Yeah, yeah. No, I went to school for biblical studies, and then got a master’s degree in New Testament. So that was my whole pathway, was to go into that and actually was a pastor for a while. Did that, and then about … gosh, how long ago? Five and a half years ago stepped out of that not because anything in my faith changed per se, but just because I was just rethinking a bunch of stuff in my life and reworking a bunch of stuff in my life. So it’s just total life change in all kinds of crazy ways. I didn’t have a clue what I was going to do actually.

Andrew:

That educational pathway doesn’t have a direct connection to almost anything that’s not work in a church or academic setting or something like that in theology. So, I really loved that education a lot, but I was figuring it out. So I called a friend of mine named Taylor Holiday, who … and I was talking to him about if there’s any available work in his world of work. Just basically as an in between thing while I figured it out. I just thought I’ll just go do something for a couple months to figure out what I want to do. He said, sure, and brought me to a company called QALO, Q-A-L-O. If you’ve seen the silicon wedding rings that are for-

Stephanie:

Oh, yeah.

Andrew:

.. on the internet a lot, QALO was the first big company of those. QALO went zero to 20 million in a year and a half and was not funded. So, I was bootstrapped. I went there and it was just growing super, super fast. Also, being not funded and being a bunch of people like that, it just meant that they just were, in those worlds probably some of your listeners probably know this story a little bit, which is like, you just find people who can do stuff in that setting. I literally started in the warehouse. At one point, I sat down with Taylor, who’s now one of my partners. Taylor was running marketing for QALO at the time. His brother was one of the founders. Taylor said, “Hey, you’ve got a mind for numbers,” which he knew because we were in a Fantasy Baseball League together and knew that I was a big baseball stat nerd.

Andrew:

May not be interesting to many of your listeners I’m sure, but I have a lot to say about the interplay of thinking about sports through statistical lens and thinking about Ecommerce. Anyway, so that was the origin. We had been in this fantasy baseball for a while, “I know you have a mind for numbers, why don’t you learn Facebook ads and Google ads and learn digital marketing?” I said, sure, but still I was not really sure what I wanted to do in the longer term. But I was like, “All right, that sounds fun.” So, did that and loved it.

Andrew:

I mean, I was so totally unaware of what was happening, but I still remember the first conversation I had with Taylor in a bank where he told me what I’d be doing. He’s explaining to me how Facebook ads, Google ads worked and said, “Is it okay? Well, here’s the deal. You get customers into the funnel with your ads and then you drive …” and I stopped him in the middle of that sentence and said, “What’s the funnel?” That was where my digital marketing knowledge was at. From there, that ended up being the pathway to the digital marketing and Ecommerce career growth. So I was at QALO for a while, went to CTC, the agency that owns our company, owns the majority of it and became the head of strategy there. And then now I run 4×400.

Andrew:

Yeah, it was a crazy set of circumstances with Taylor. We actually went to junior high together, but had not reconnected because of that. We reconnected outside of that. So, just weird circumstances.

Stephanie:

That’s interesting.

Andrew:

This gets into my life philosophy a little bit. I’m a believer in divine providence and think there was some of that happening around.

Stephanie:

For sure. Yeah, that’s awesome. Always good to be in business with someone who’s willing to bet on you because you have that beginner’s mindset and it’s probably why you’re doing so well. But I’d love for you to detail a little bit about the structure of CTC and 4×400 in the holding company structure because we haven’t had anyone on the show quite like this. So, any details around what 4×400 is and how it’s connected to CTC would be great.

Andrew:

Yeah, sure. Common Thread Collective, it grew out of … Taylor was building the agency alongside the growth of QALO. Started really focusing on Facebook ads. CTC does a lot more in that now, but CTC is now a full service digital sales agency. We said digital sales sell digital marketing because what we’re doing is selling things on the internet, it’s consumer goods, really focusing on Ecommerce entrepreneurs. The mission of CTC is to help entrepreneurs achieve their dreams. So that’s really what we’re about. We’re specifically really good taking people in somewhere in the journey from zero to 30 million.

Andrew:

I was a strategist there and then became the head of strategy there. CTC continues to grow and do well. Taylor Holiday, as I mentioned is the managing partner of CTC.

Andrew:

In the midst of that, we also were like … I mean, we came from this background of starting QALO. Taylor also was early on with another one of our partners named Josh Rodarmel who founded Power Balance. If you don’t know Power Balance, Power Balance was the really popular silicon bracelets that were worn by athletes for a long time, still are worn by some.

Andrew:

That company was another super crazy fast growth company. I think they were zero to 50 in a year and a half. Yeah, I think that was the number. But anyway, I did on the brand side selling consumer goods in those worlds. We’re like, why don’t we launch our own brands as well? So, that’s how 4×400 started. Eventually I went over to that side of the business. We started with building our own brand from scratch. It totally saw giant failure called [inaudible] company, just a huge waste of money. It doesn’t exist anymore. It was sports themed baby goods and it just … there are a lot of reasons that didn’t work

Stephanie:

Wait, sports themed baby goods, so-

Andrew:

Yeah, yeah.

Stephanie:

… like onesies.

Andrew:

Yeah. Like onesies that look like football uniforms. They’re adorable. I don’t know why nobody bought them.

Stephanie:

Okay, that’s super cute. I’ll buy one from you.

Andrew:

Yeah. I think that you’d have to go find a flea market in Northern California somewhere. I had to go get it every day.

Stephanie:

I will find one, I actually need to for my twin. So, it’ll be a long journey, but I’m going to do it.

Andrew:

Okay. You’re in Northern California, right?

Stephanie:

Yeah.

Andrew:

Yeah, I think that’s who we sold to, so [inaudible] don’t worry. We did that, and then realized actually most of our skill at this point … most last couple years that we have really been spent after we’d gotten out of the brand side so much growing brands, not so much building brands. So we thought, why don’t we just do that? Now our model is, at 4×400, we work with entrepreneurs who are in early stages and feel a little stalled out. We provide them with a team around them that can help them grow it. 4×400 mission is also to help entrepreneurs achieve their dreams. We just do it in a different way than CTC.

Andrew:

CTC does that the traditional client relationship 4×400, takes the majority share of the brand. And then our goal is to make it so that by bringing us on as a partner and all of the expertise and resources we have around finance operations, marketing, growth customer service, even just really thinking through the whole system of what it means to be a great Ecommerce brand, we can help brands grow. We just closed actually our fifth brand that is currently in our portfolio. We’re hoping to close another one soon. Who knows by the time it comes out, if that will happen? We’re trying to work with brands who are doing less than half a million in revenue and saying like “We can try to grow you from there.” CTC is the majority owner 4×400. 4×400 is the majority owner of these brands. So there’s this giant web of relationships there.

Stephanie:

Yeah, okay. That helps me understand the landscape a bit more. How do you think about acquiring brands, how do you find brands that are willing to say, “Okay, we’ll give you a majority share and come under your company”?

Andrew:

Yeah. Well, there’s a few ways. CTC is a magnet for some of them. Sometimes brands will come to CTC and CTC will say, we’re not the right partner for you. You’re not a place where you can afford us. One piece of advice I have for a lot of it was like, if you are paying an agency not very much money you should really think about whether the agency is good because agency economics just require, for you to get great service, they typically require a pretty good investment. Just think about it. Agencies exist by marking up people’s time. So, an agency works well if they are able to attract and train great talent by nature of access to large amounts of information.

Andrew:

The value of an agency is that they are spending millions and millions of dollars of other people’s money on stuff. So, it’s information arbitrage in that respect. You can come to an agency and get that information applied to your brand in a way that maybe an in house resource can’t always do because they just are not going to have the visibility to as much of what’s going on. For that to work, then you have to mark up that time of high quality, talented people who are probably not cheap. And then also for something like Facebook ads, Google ads, and then oftentimes there’s a creative element of that and a writing element of that, and a strap gentleman have that, so that means you got to pay designers and other people like that too. And then there’s web dev parts of it. You start to put that all together and if it’s too cheap, then you have to be going like, wait a minute, what am I actually getting here?

Andrew:

Some brands in the early days, will come to … they’ll be stalled out or come to CTC for resources. CTC will say to them, actually you can’t really afford this. What we actually think is a better solution for you is to talk about a deeper investment where we can really surround you with more stuff. What we find is a lot of entrepreneurs love product building and customer communication in certain ways. They love their customer, they love their product idea people, but they don’t necessarily have all of the skills around everything else it takes to grow a brand. In fact, they don’t want to do those things.

Andrew:

Most entrepreneurs don’t start brands because they love finance, they don’t. They don’t even necessarily love tactical marketing. A lot of times what we can say to them is, “Let us take all that stuff that you hate doing anyway from you, you feel overwhelmed and stalled all the time anyway. You come with us, we’ll pay you a consistent salary,” which is also a big help to some people who are going like, I just don’t even know if I can perform this anymore. We’ll help you grow. Some entrepreneurs want to stay on, some don’t, some just wants to take it. So it really depends on each entrepreneur, but that’s basically a lot of how we think about it.

Andrew:

And then for us, we evaluate the brand by saying like, “Does it have basic product market fit and basic fundamentals to where we think as we bring in all of our tactical expertise and all of our specific expertise in various disciplines that we can then apply that to the brand and grow it?” A brand who comes to us who hasn’t really invested much in paid media, but has done 100 to $300,000 in revenue, we look at that and say, “That’s …” Actually, we have a really high amount of respect for that. It’s really hard to do that, it’s hard to do $100,000 without being good at Facebook ads. It’s not easy. So we look at that and say like, “Good job. We don’t think you’re a failure. If you come to us and want our help, we think we get it.” We look at that and say, “That’s very impressive. Let us surround you now with resources that we can scale this to 10, $20 million in revenue.”

Stephanie:

Very cool. How are your brands performing now?

Andrew:

Yeah, good. They’re doing good.

Andrew:

I think COVID really helped Ecommerce brands massively. Two things happen at the same time. One of them is that large corporations who have diversity of sales channels, but were spending lots of money on advertising, pulled their advertising budgets the way the heck back. Of course, lots of other companies couldn’t produce products. So they couldn’t sell products in retail settings, so they pulled a lot of the budget back. They couldn’t produce products because of supply chain problems. And then at the same time … So that meant that in large auction based advertising work universes like Facebook ads and Google ads, ads got suddenly way cheaper really fast.

Andrew:

The way that works is that because those are built on an auction, if a lot of people leave the auction everybody’s prices get cheaper. We’ve looked at this data across CTC accounts. There was a giant plummeting of advertising CPMs in those worlds. And then at the same time in the last couple months, conversion rate on websites went up because the only place to capture demand was online. You couldn’t go buy stuff in the store. So if you’re selling things on the internet, that’s where people are buying things from. And then of course, the stimulus checks it. As people have noted, that actually ended up being one of the largest increases in revenue to the average American family in history. So, all of a sudden, people have money to spend. Whether or not they should have spent it on consumer goods is a different question, I don’t really know. But they had money to spend.

Andrew:

The less places for that demand to be captured mostly on Ecommerce stores. And then also, it got a lot cheaper to reach those people with ads. You put that all together and Ecommerce did really, really, really well for a couple months. So that really helped us. There’s no question about it. We’re still feeling some of the positive effects of that. It feels weird to be a winner in COVID, but there’s no question that Ecommerce brands were .. To varying degrees depending on the category you’re in, for sure.

Andrew:

We have three brands that are in the established stage and not in the start it up stage.

Stephanie:

What account is established, is it a revenue metric or-

Andrew:

Yeah, a good question. I’d say a million dollars during 12 months, or a million dollar run rate. We would look at and say, “Okay, we’re growing at the pace that we want.” I can just give you some numbers. We’re projected this year to go to have one of our brains go to 8 million, that brand did 100,000 in 2017. Last year, we really took it over halfway through the year. I think we ended at 750 for the year. So, that’s definitely our fastest growing brand right now.

Stephanie:

That’s [crosstalk 00:16:47].

Andrew:

Another one-

Stephanie:

… some good growth right there.

Andrew:

Yeah. We feel good about that. That’s profitable too, which is definitely in our model. We took on a little bit of funding early, but not a ton of funding. We function more like a bootstrapped company. And then another one went from … just a little over two years ago, we acquired it. It was basically doing no revenue, it’ll do 3 million this year. Yeah, that’s a different story. And then another one went from 250 to a million to just under two, this year, we’ll do four to four and a half probably. So those ones are all we feel established growing at the pace we want, we feel really good about.

Stephanie:

Yeah. That’s some impressive number. How do you grow these brands? What are some of your tactics and strategies that you rely on those, what do you see success with? How can someone else learn from what y’all are doing to grow their Ecommerce companies?

Andrew:

Yeah. Facebook ads is the core driver of customer acquisition for us. I mean, selling consumer goods direct to consumer online, Facebook ads is still the most powerful tool in the world for reaching people. I’m hearing chatter about other things, YouTube, Snap, even Tik Tok, Google ads, product’s changing. I just think still at this point, at scale, depending on what you mean by scale, people define that word differently. But for us, that’s the core, top of the funnel way that we get traffic to our website.

Andrew:

I mean, you think about what Facebook ads is, it’s not buying ads so much as buying traffic. I guess it’s both really. But we look at that and say, “If we can make the traffic worth more than we’re paying for it, worth enough more that we’re paying for it to cover the cost of goods and things like that,” I should say, “Then we can win.” That’s how we drive top of funnel traffic for us. And then after that, we try to do everything that we think great brands should do, which is like create a beautiful website that treats their customers great, has generous returns and shipping policies as much as we can afford to do it basically, which varies from brand to brand, depending on a number of factors. Do a great job with your retention email and other automated flow stuff. Constantly testing conversion rate optimization on our site in various ways. There’s just a whole bunch of that kind of stuff that we’re doing on the backend of that.

Andrew:

We are also certainly looking to invest in other top of the funnel type metrics, our traffic drivers as well. I would think of Google search as mid funnel and Google shopping as mid funnel. So, we’re definitely investing there as well. I think we’ll keep doing other stuff. That won’t work forever. There’s going to be a cap to how much Facebook ads does the driver work and we fully intend to add to our customer acquisition approach when we can. But our goal has been to grow profitably and we think that’s one of the best ways to do it right now.

Andrew:

The other thing is it’s not just one of the best ways to do it, it’s just that we also have deep expertise in it. So, I’m just a believer that do the thing you do well as much as you can. I think it works for leadership and working with teams. Just as much as we can set up our team members to be doing the things that they love doing and they’re good at. As long as the things that people love doing and are good at create value for the company, then you should pay them to do it. So that’s the way we look at it too.

Andrew:

Just coming from the agency side, I personally have managed, I don’t know, 25 ad accounts, that’s probably more than that. Seen a lot more of that when I was the head of strategy and working with other strategists. I don’t mean that to brag. It means that now I have some intellectual capital built up on what works. So, that’s what we use from there.

Stephanie:

Cool. To drill in a little bit deeper then for the Facebook ads because I think a lot of companies probably have looked at Facebook ads, maybe they’re using it. I haven’t heard of anyone growing liked you guys are growing your brands consistently. So what tactics are you using specifically, or what do you see works well?

Andrew:

Yeah, there’s a lot I can say about that. I think this is going to sound so fishy, but if you’re getting serious about that, there’s a couple of things … The thing I would actually tell you to do, if you don’t know where to start and you’re getting serious about it, is to go visit your admission.co. I don’t know, maybe I can give you a link to this, Stephanie, at some-

Stephanie:

Yeah, we can link it up.

Andrew:

Cool, yeah. So that is CTC’s education program. It’s not a course, it’s different than every other education thing I know of in this world. It’s actually a moderated community with access to … Taylor, the CEO of CTC is in there doing webinars like our team members, our brand managers and people like that. Also, might jump in there and do webinars exclusively for that community. What we’re doing is teaching all of the things that are … what we believe are really the best practices for Facebook ads from the perspective of creative, from the perspective of targeting, bidding, all that kind of stuff. Bringing people through all of those things and then giving them continued support with access to the actual CTC teams who are doing that same thing that I was describing, which is spending millions of dollars of other people’s money, so you can have access to that knowledge set. I think it’s 500 bucks a month right now.

Andrew:

I even say sometimes there’s even executive level people who will take their whole team through it. It’s not like you’re going to be in it for forever. The point is that you can do that and get access to what we believe works best. We’re always evaluating that. There are certainly other things to do there, but that’ll give you what we … We try to be really honest and transparent where we can about what we’re seeing. So that will give you mental ways to think about that problem.

Andrew:

I think one of the things that can go wrong is you could listen to me talk about this, and maybe you’re an entrepreneur and you hear my numbers and you go like, I’m going to go do that. You just blow money because you make simple mistakes that somebody could help you not make, if you’ve just got some support. There is no way to learn besides doing it really. You’re going to make mistakes, it’s okay. In my view, creative needs to be really product focused in the sense that it’s on Facebook ads and Instagram ads. You are driving high quality traffic by giving people a clear sense of what your product is right away. Clear wins over everything else first as a baseline.

Andrew:

Clear doesn’t make you give you the best out in the world. They’re clear plus some other things do that, but clear establishes a baseline of what you can expect and at least drives what I consider high quality traffic to your side. People who are interested in you because of your product. So that’s probably the first basic principle I would say is focus on being clear in your creative before you focus on being clever or funny, or any of those kinds of things. You can drive a lot of very cheap traffic to your website with Clickbait tactics, but they won’t buy anything. Ultimately, it won’t matter how cheap the traffic is if they don’t buy anything. So that’s the kind of thing I would say.

Andrew:

And then the other big thing I’m a huge believer in is trust the algorithm. There was a world where people talk about Facebook ads as the value of micro-targeting that was one of the phrases people would talk about. This idea that you’d go find exactly your customer really specifically target them without everybody else. I think there was a time when that was part of how you did it. Those times are gone. What I would say is what you want to do is give Facebook as much information as possible and let Facebook’s algorithm predict the future for you because humans are terrible at predicting the future. Algorithms are pretty good at it. So, algorithms do a really good job of looking at the data set of who’s responding to your advertising. And then going and saying, here’s some more people like that to put you out in front of. So, we believe in really broad targeting.

Andrew:

Let Facebook have as much freedom as you can to go and find the next person to put you out in front of. Over time, not even over that much time, Facebook’s amazing in this regard much quicker than Google is at this. Facebook will find who those people are. So that’s the broad principles I would say is trust the algorithm, be clear with your creative. There you go. There’s just so much more I could say about the Stephanie, but I’m going to stop there. So I don’t take up the entire rest of the podcast.

Stephanie:

Okay, cool. Yeah, we will definitely link that up. I think it’s a really important point too to segment a piece of your ad budget for testing. I know we do that internally as I’ll tell. Our team members are like, “Hey, you have this much money. If you spend it and you just learn from it, that’s okay. Versus this amount let’s actually protected and make sure we drive results with it.” So I think it’s good to go into a mindset being okay with using a portion of ads for an R&D type testing project. So, you feel like you can learn from it, but not blow your entire budget on it.

Andrew:

Okay, no question. Constantly testing is super crucial. What I’d say about that is, when I want to test on Facebook ads, the place I want to test most is take big swings with your tests. The common thing you hear people say with testing, you’ll hear people like, I’ve seen so many articles trumpeting like, oh, we changed our CTC button color or we changed it from [inaudible] now and it was a 15% lift.

Andrew:

First of all, I just don’t believe those studies anymore. Secondly, the reason you’re writing about it is because it’s exceptional. It doesn’t happen all the time. I just think that’s a waste of people’s time. But most people need to do, if they’re looking to go from not successful to successful, the larger the difference in outcome you want, the bigger the change you need to make. You can’t just change the background color of your ad and expect that it give you wildly different results. That’s once you have results you like and now you’re just dialing in and trying to grab an extra 2% of value here and there. I just rarely see that thing work.

Andrew:

What I would say is much better to think to test is something like, what’s the offer that you’re giving people? What’s the product you’re starting with and leading with? That can create wildly different results. We just ran something for our jewelry company that we … 31 Bits, which is our other most recent acquisition, our fourth brand. We started with a batch of ads focusing on one set of products were necklaces and bracelets and things like that. We were getting a dollar of 50 clicks, low click through rates, et cetera, and very poor conversion rate.

Andrew:

We changed the product set, same exact brand, similar styles of photography, but just different products to a whole different category of product and saw triple or more the performance suddenly CTC went way down. Click through rate, went way up, conversion went way up. The reason why is really obvious, it’s jewelry, some people like some bracelets better than others. If you just use the same stuff all the time, people are going to respond to it the same way over time. There’s no magic to that. That’s how people shop for something that you wear. It’s about what it looks like. So, by changing the products that we led with that made a huge difference. So that’s what I’d say is for Ecommerce consumer good people, that’s the kind of test you want to be running.

Andrew:

Give it a whole different products out, a whole different offer, a whole different way of framing the offer, don’t just change little bits of the creative and copy if you want to change your outcome in a big way.

Stephanie:

Yeah. I love that. People I talk to sometimes are focused on those micro adjustments that you’re talking about or just the minimal incremental pieces that they could change, whether it’s button colors or all that. That’s a good point too. Yeah. Focus on the higher level things. But how did you decide on what new products to show?

Andrew:

In that case, part of it was what new products … there’s a change in our product development, that’s going to make it so, or in our manufacturing that was going to make it to that, we’re phasing out some products anyway. We always start by looking at most products over various periods of time. This is a simple way to start. I mean, there’s not a lot of science to it in that respect. I think we’re just looking around-

Stephanie:

Just seeing what it’s doing well in the market.

Andrew:

Yeah. And what’s done well on our side. Honestly, part of it is for a place to start your testing just like make a hypothesis and test it. I mean, it’s not-

Stephanie:

Yeah. What timeframe are you looking at? When you do the test, are you looking at 30 days? Let’s see how it does and try something new, or is it like after a couple of days you’ll know and try something different?

Andrew:

Yeah. I’d say budget is probably a bigger factor than time. So if you’re spending thousands of dollars a day, it doesn’t take very long good answers. If you’re spending a couple $100 a day, it takes a little longer. It also changes relative to your average order value. What you need is a statistically significant number of responses and really a statistically significant number of conversions. You can think of conversions as micro conversions as well. For example, a click on an ad is a conversion in a sense. Clicks as a percentage of impressions is a conversion. Because it’s pretty cheap to run Facebook ads, you can actually figure out a reliable statistically significant performance in a click through rate pretty fast without having to see how those clicks convert.

Andrew:

In that case, it took us, I mean, I think we’re got 100 bucks, when we knew that this new round of ads was way, way better performing because the gap and click through rate was so significant between the two. That’s another core principle here. The larger the gap and the outcome, or the larger the disparity in the outcome, the more likely it is that it’s a reliable result, if that makes sense. In that case, I think we spent between the two products, that’s a total of 1,500 bucks. The whole goal of that was to test those while we went and ordered new products to try and start scaling a little bit for a larger test in the future. I didn’t really care what the actual result was. The goal is a bigger goal to win bigger over time.

Stephanie:

Yeah, that makes sense. When talking about growing, I saw that you guys live by a central Ecommerce growth formula. I was hoping you could go into that a bit.

Andrew:

Yeah. This is changing a little bit in some ways. I’ll give you the baseline version of it, which is visitors tasks conversion rate times average order value. This is actually really simple. Every business in the world only actually has three factors that make up the value that you get from a purchase, or that make up your revenue actually. The first factor is how many people come to your business. This could be people walk into your store, it doesn’t have to be a website. But just never people who show up. And then you multiply that by the conversion rate. So, what percentage of those people buy something from you? And then you multiply that by how much they spend.

Andrew:

When you look at that, that will equal your revenue. If you just say, how many people get there, how many of those people buy and how much they spend when they do? That’s the entirety that makes up the revenue. That’s incredibly simple and intuitive in a lot of ways. But what I find is that in the fog of war, people lose sight of that very simple concept. So, they start making tests and changes without a really clear idea of which one or multiple of those variables they’re actually trying to affect. Of course, those all relate to each other. For example, your average order value goes up, your conversion rate goes down, that’s a general rule of thumb, it’s true across everything. It’s intuitive when you think about it.

Andrew:

A smaller percentage of people are going to buy a $1,000 item than a $10 item. As you drive more traffic, it’s highly likely that you’re driving lower and lower quality traffic. Everybody exists along in the world, exists along a continuum of people likely to buy your product and unlikely to buy your product from your mother, who’s the most likely person in the world to buy your product to-

Stephanie:

That is number one.

Andrew:

Yes. To a subsistence farmer who doesn’t have the internet is the least likely person. The farther you go from your mom to the subsistence farmer, the more expensive it is to acquire that customer. So as traffic grows, then your conversion rate is likely to go down. That’s just another helpful concept, I think. These are rules of thumb to heuristics they’re not always true, but that’s a basic way of thinking about it. We think about those three levers in what we do and really try to understand when we test something at any point in our funnel, whether it’s on the website or ad level or whatever, which one of those am I actually trying to affect? Where’s the problem in my business?

Andrew:

I’ve talked with friends of mine who own CrossFit gyms, and I’ve said to them like … I’m thinking of a friend in particular whose gym was struggling. I was trying to help him think this way, which of these is the problem for you? Are not enough people showing up to your gym? Or when they show up, do they not buy a membership? Or do they buy a cheap membership or you give them a month free and then they don’t spend any money after that? Which one of these is the problem? That probably gets towards LTV as well, or CLV, Customer lifetime Value as something to think about in the midst of all this as well. This is where you can make it a little more complicated, but that basic principle is true. Across the gym, just like on my consumer goods websites, it’s the same problem. You just have to figure out which one of those things has the highest upside at the lowest cost to fix next. That’s where you should put your energy.

Stephanie:

Yeah, I love that. Have you ever pitched a brand to be taken over by a 4×400 that you believed in where everyone else on your team didn’t believe in it?

Andrew:

Oh yeah. This is where it helps to be coldly rational. Gosh, I don’t mean rational like smart, I’m always right. I just mean my approach is unemotional to a lot of this stuff. To the probably emotional dysfunction in other ways in my life or something like that, I’m not saying you should emulate this necessarily. But that’s why there’s therap, so it’s fine. So, sorry? I know there’s some noise there. A lot of times, if we’re tweeting about a new brand acquisition. People will say privately like, “I do believe in this,” or “I don’t believe in this.” I just started think that’s like … I think without having the view that I have in the acquisition process, I just don’t even know what somebody is judging that on. People just go by their general sense of what they believe about if it’s a good brand or not.

Andrew:

First of all, other people are not like you. Your subjective sense of that may not reflect at all what I brought population to potential customers is. Secondly, to me, you can validate this pretty clearly by looking at simple product market fit, things like margin is a huge question, which makes businesses work and it makes other businesses fail, is one of the problems of opening day. We made a huge mistake by just giving ourselves away too little margin on the products.

Stephanie:

What’s the little margin, what do you consider small?

Andrew:

Yeah. Well, I think if you’re going to try and grow a brand with … I’ll just tell you, we target 70 points plus of margin for brands that we are trying to grow with our method of growth. And then that’s really important. If you have other growth mechanisms that might not matter as much. But for us, we want 70 points plus landed margin. We can deal with a little less than that, but if you’re going to try and grow a brand with Facebook ads, you’re going to need to be able to exist at a two to one return on your money on ads probably. It’s hard to really beat that number, if not withstanding something like coronavirus throwing those small. So we target that. That becomes a big question for us, if we think we can do that.

Andrew:

Sometimes actually it’s part of the first thing we have to fix for a brand is, we see supply chain processes that are in our view broken and we would say like, “We love everything about this brand. It’s convergent on site, is great relative to its average order value, relative to its traffic sources.” We dig into all that stuff, and say, “But your margin is not good enough, but we think we can solve that. W can help with getting your shipping cost down by repackaging it differently, or thinking about what products to focus on or not, or changing your manufacturer or something like that.” We don’t want to ever do that at the expense of giving people a good product. We haven’t compromised on that at this point, which I’m happy about. But yeah, those are all the things that we can look at as potentially something to fix. But in our view, 70 points plus, makes the game a lot easier for sure.

Stephanie:

Got it. I like that point too about, what would someone know when they’re doubting a brand? Because that is definitely a human flaw thinking about … even when I’m thinking about those rubber bracelets from a while back, for me to say, “Oh, that’s dumb,” I don’t need to be balanced or anything, or I need help with that. It’s funny because it’s like, well, apparently a lot of other people did because look how many people bought it. Yeah, I think that’s also a good lesson for anyone starting something up. If they hear someone say like, “Oh, that’s dumb, you shouldn’t do that.” Probably good to take a step back and be like, well, that’s just one person’s opinion and not let it deter you from trying at least.

Andrew:

Yes, especially relative to the set of metrics I have in front of me, which are going to tell me something a little bit different. This is one of the things that’s so great about data is that I’m just wrong, Stephanie, about so many things in life, I just know I am. So having some source outside of my own brain that I can look at. When my own eyes are lying to me, humans are just biased machines. We’re just machines of bad thinking about stuff. So, finding ways to be aware of my priors going into something and my bias going into something, check those against some sorts of truths that exist outside myself. Of course, people can lie with data and data can be poorly collected. There’s all kinds of ways that can go wrong too. But in light of all those things, I just think that it becomes really helpful to do that, to go and have a source like that to go check in. So that’s what we do in our process.

Andrew:

There’s various levels of excitement about brands even internally. But there’s no question that … We sincerely believe it can work based on the data set in front of us and a few other old principals. So that’s what we do.

Stephanie:

That’s cool. We’re mentioning data, stick with the data when it comes to it and don’t just listen to unfounded opinions. What kind of metrics do you look at that you think a lot of other brands aren’t utilizing enough? There’s obvious ones like conversions and click-through rates and all that kind of stuff and revenue obviously, but is there anything that you look at that you think enough people aren’t paying attention to?

Andrew:

There’s no magic here. After we acquired 31 Bits, this jewelry company … really super cool brand. This brand was started by women who were anthropology majors in college and wanted to provide good quality jobs to people who could not access them by nature of where they lived in the world. So they started in Uganda after a trip there and had these women making these really cool beads. This started in 2009. These women were out to change the world with this brand. It’s just totally authentic, beautiful brand story around all of this stuff. When we acquired that, I on my podcast, it’s called-

Stephanie:

What is your podcast?

Andrew:

Yeah, yeah. I feel so lame doing this right now, but-

Stephanie:

Oh, sorry, Andrew.

Andrew:

I know. There’s a tangent there. But anyway, if somebody really wants to hear how I think about this question, I spent about 45 minutes with Taylor, the head of our agency, talking about exactly why we acquired 31 Bits. We did an episode about that. I’ll find it and send it to you for the show notes as well. And then we interviewed the ladies from the brand for the next episode after that, so people could kinda hear why they chose us as well. We tried to be really honest about why we think it’ll work and why we think it could fail. I would say the metrics related to that, that I care about, it’s not just conversion rate it’s conversion rate relative to average order value and relative to traffic sources. That’s a huge one for us.

Andrew:

Conversion rate itself is actually so context specific that it’s not that helpful of a metric. I mean, think about the conversion rate of a direct click. Somebody comes to the website, types in 31bits.com, presses enter. Let’s take a 45 year old female on a desktop computer direct versus a 25 year old male on their cellphone through a display ad on the internet, saying conversion rates to describe what both of those people are doing and getting a baseline is not going to be helpful at all because the baseline for those two different customers of what you’d expect, they’re so different. I mean, just the device issue you’re twice as likely to convert on desktop than you are as mobile before you talk about any of the rest of the demographic’s software or anything like that.

Andrew:

We try to really give some specificity of the context of something like conversion rate. Even one thing you’ll see there is like, sometimes the brand’s conversion rate will look low, but it’s actually not low. The reason it looks low is because they’re getting a ton of blog traffic via organic search SEO essentially. That blog traffic is technically on their URL, but it’s not at all related to their product and it’s not people looking for their product. Therefore, that blog traffic will have an incredibly low conversion rate and will therefore negatively influenced the total conversion rate. If you bucket that blog traffic out, it turns out the conversion and the brand is fine and their website works great and you just didn’t realize that. I don’t know if that example made sense. But there’s-

Stephanie:

It does make sense.

Andrew:

… there’s just all of these kinds of contexts, things like that, that I think are really crucial to look at all the way around. We look at some other stuff like we’ve looked at entire funnel on our site, so we’ll look at not just the conversion rate thing. If somebody doesn’t buy something on your website, there’s a question of why did they not buy? Because they made it to your website, so what happened next? Did they never add anything to cart or did they add to cart and then drop off once they got to checkout or did they never even make it to checkout or what? We look at each of those things and try to understand what’s going on.

Andrew:

If somebody adds to cart and makes them check out and then drops off, why? The answer to that question is probably because you’re shipping cost is too much a lot of times, or it’s going to get shipped slowly, or they’re not confident in return policy or whatever. So we’ll look at some of that stuff too. We have a value of 4×400, which is understanding before you act and paired with that is hard problems require deep focus, or require deep work. The basic concept is like, before I go and throw out a million solutions, I want to really understand as clear of terms as possible exactly what’s wrong.

Andrew:

When I hear somebody say my Facebook ads are broken, the thing I want to say is, “What do you mean? What’s happening? What broken-

Stephanie:

What are you doing?

Andrew:

Right, yeah. “Is the conversion rate broken? Are the clicks too expensive? Where is the problem? Are you not getting a high enough AOV? When you say it’s broken, what do you mean?” To try to help people answer that question because then it can guide where to think about the next problem.

Stephanie:

Cool. I love that. Yeah, that was a really good example.

Stephanie:

Are there any things, technology or otherwise tools that you’re using right now that are maybe new that you’re excited about?

Andrew:

Well, I’ll tell you what I think that is, it’s not the answer you’re looking for, but I think it’s the answer that I get.

Stephanie:

Go for it.

Andrew:

My answer is no I don’t. We will get there to where we’ll need to do that, but I just think this is a massive distraction for a lot of people. I think people love to go chase the next new thing. They’ll even say things like, “well, my customer is on Tik Tok.” I don’t really know what that means. Yes-

Stephanie:

I don’t really know who’s on Tik Tok right now.

Andrew:

I’m 36. First all, I’m 36, I’m too old and I don’t get Tik Tok. I’ve never had Facebook on my phone, so I’m just the worst social media marketer ever in that respect. I do not understand what’s happening in the world. I just don’t always know what that kind of thing means. I think your customers probably also want Instagram because there’s a lot of people on Instagram. So I could be wrong about that, I guess. I’d be so happy for somebody to correct me if that’s the case and reach out and tell me, “You’re not looking at this right.” Anyway, I just think it becomes a huge distraction for people to go and try and find another new thing to go do instead of to get really good in one or two areas.

Andrew:

We will expand channels over time. I think we’re really trying to build out more search and shopping as a next step for us, that is not a new channel at all. It’s actually the oldest digital marketing channel, search in particular,. I’m playing around with some ideas from SEO, but really I’m just trying to make my customer more valuable at this point. So, just trying to really get better via email, post-purchase, via my unboxing experience, trying to think about how unboxing and product experience creates retention in word of mouth. I’m trying to dig deeper and get better at the things I’m already doing rather than adding a whole lot, I think.

Stephanie:

With everything happening in the world right now, it does seem like there, like you mentioned early on the show, there’re a lot of changes happening, especially around Ecommerce. I know you’re talking about focusing on what’s working and all that, but is there anything you’re preparing for over the next three to five years that you’re anticipating around Ecommerce trends?

Andrew:

Yeah, all right. This is my coronavirus beat right non. This is a really fun question and is a great podcast fodder. I do not fault you for asking it and I don’t want you to hear my answer to this as condescending. But there’s no possible way in the world that I could predict the future that far out. Here’s what I believe about predicting the future. The more complex the system you’re project predicting with the more inputs that there are there, over the longer the timeline, the harder it is to project. So, I might be able to give you some sense of what’s happening next week, but then also last week, all these companies started saying they’re going to pull their Facebook ad spend.

Stephanie:

Yeah. I didn’t why I mention that, but I’m like well, that seems like it’s a good opportunity then, like you’re mentioning to get on Facebook.

Andrew:

Yeah, yeah.

Stephanie:

I think Zuckerberg even said they’ll be back or something like that, which is just funny.

Andrew:

First of all, who could have predicted over that timeline, that kind of thing would happen? Before you even talk about Zuckerberg, who … There’s just so many elements. The system of macroeconomics in the U.S., before you even talk to the world, is so big with so many inputs and so complex that I just don’t believe in anybody’s ability to really predict that. So what I think is that it’s not helpful generally to do that. I’ll say three to five years, the one thing I feel broadly, fairly comfortable with though, I think even this has, there’s some basic questions is that Ecommerce, as an industry, Ecommerce is a share of U.S. retail spending, will continue to grow.

Andrew:

I mean, I just have no possible way of predicting that. So I feel like it’s a good place to be if you’re in Ecom, I think you should be investing in Ecom broadly. I just don’t think otherwise it’s very possible to do that. I mean, just look at what we were all saying about coronavirus two months ago and the models that we were all looking at about what this thing could be. It’s been devastating. I don’t want to underplay that, but it has not been in the U.S. the millions of deaths at this point, at least. Who knows that people were predicting? I just look at that and go like, that’s because predicting that many things for something with that much unknown is really, really hard.

Andrew:

My take on this is to go read Nate Silver’s book, The Signal and the Noise and to hone your skills thinking about what kinds of things you can and can’t project, and even how to think about projecting things. And then to go from there, which means the way you win is not by predicting the future, but by honing your fundamentals and carving really good thought processes. This is what I really believe in the most. To think about this all like poker, which is that good poker players don’t win by winning a hand, they win by playing lots of hands really well and by making the right move over and over. Understanding the game that there are going to be times when they’re going to be in a big spot with a lot of money in the pot and the card will come up and go the wrong way. But if they play enough big pots and enough money in it, the law of large numbers says that they’ll win over time. I think that’s the way to think about it.

Andrew:

Get really good at understanding something like visitors and conversion rate times average order value and asking the right questions about that. Get really good at following your profit margins everywhere you can . Get as much clarity about them as you possibly can that way you know where your money is going and where you’re making money and where you’re not. If you can do those things over a long period of time and just get good at finding good people to work with and get good at those sorts of things, you will win. So ultimately, I bought into the partnership at CTC with my own money, I’m not rich.

Andrew:

The reason I put my money into that is because I believe in the humans that are the partner group there, and I believe that those people overall given enough chances will win. That’s the way I think you should think about your brand and your business is find partners and find brands and businesses that you believe will play the right hand the most times and are people of high character. That is part of the right hand of what you’re play, you’re going to have a relationship with these people. Every part of your business, if you can do those things, then I think over the aggregate, you’re going to win.

Stephanie:

That’s great. That actually took a very nice spin because at first I’m like, okay, no one’s going to disagree with you that Ecommerce is going to grow. But I like the spin that you just took on it about what you should focus on instead. So, good answer.

Andrew:

Thanks. Yeah, I know. It’s a compound answer in some ways, but it’s really what I believe is true about the world. It’s so sexy to say, okay, over the next month, this is going to happen and this is going to happen. Next time somebody on the show gives you that answer, bring them back on in six months and ask them what happened and-

Stephanie:

I was just going to say that. I think the world is still missing a little bit of the accountability piece because I see people still on Twitter, even the people who are talking about the end of the world, no one’s following up with these people, how come this guy has had a billboard out around California for a long time saying the end of the world was going to happen, I guess, a few weeks ago, and it didn’t? What now, are we going to follow up with him and be like, “Hey, what happened?”

Andrew:

Yeah, that’s a very California story. I like that.

Stephanie:

All right. We’re going to shift now into something called the lightning round brought to you by our friends at Salesforce Commerce Cloud. This is where I’m going to ask you a quick question and you have a minute or less to answer. Are you ready, Andrew?

Andrew:

I am. But this is the ultimate challenge for me.

Stephanie:

This will be the hardest part of the interview.

Andrew:

Yeah, it probably are. All right, I’ll do my best.

Stephanie:

I actually feel like you’re going to have some great answers, that’s why I’ve been excited to get to this. All right. If you were to have a podcast, who would your first guest be and what would the show be about? Other than the podcast that you’re running now, you can’t say that one.

Andrew:

Okay. I think it would be about exploring. Does it my guess have to be a live or can I pick anybody?

Stephanie:

No.

Andrew:

Okay. I think it would be about exploring big ideas about the world like theology, philosophy kind of stuff, but for the every man or woman. So, it would try not to be too much in the clouds, my guess would be C. S. Lewis, not because he’s the most interesting thinker in the history of the world, although he’s a really interesting thinker, but because he says things in really interesting ways. So, I think he would be a fascinating guy to just sit and talk with. When I think of a historical person I’d want to talk with most, would be that. Either that or a baseball ball guest.

Stephanie:

All right. Well, that’s cool. That’s a good answer. What’s up next on your reading list?

Andrew:

Books I’m in the middle of or after?

Stephanie:

I’d say, you can do both, middle of and ones that you’re looking back on like, that was a good book.

Andrew:

Okay. The Color of Law is the book I’m in the middle of right now. Richard Rothstein going through the history of government and forced racism in the U.S. incredibly helpful book for me so far. I’m three quarters away through. Highly recommended to try and get your head on straight about what’s going on with race in the U.S. just pure history. It’s really good. And then I am reading a Christian book called Money, Possessions and Eternity about how to use your money for compassion and care for people instead of for yourself. So, that’s what I’m in the middle of right now. And a baseball book called Ball Four, which is a famous book.

Stephanie:

That’s cool. If you were to pick a country to focus on to maybe buy a new brand from, what country would you look into?

Andrew:

A country?

Stephanie:

Yeah. If you were to bet big, I’m going to go for something in India, that’s top of mind right now because I just read the whole thing between India and China and turning off Tik Tok in India. So, it’s very interesting to me thinking about, if you were to bet on brands from a certain country or are you looking to go international, where would you go?

Andrew:

I think the answer is India. I think that’s probably the right answer. The cost of reaching people in India is very cheap and India’s economy seems to be growing very fast. But I’m just bullish on global economy in general. So, I think you could probably broadly pick out. In the last 50 years, massive amounts of extreme poverty have been alleviated in the world thanks to globalization and technology and all kinds of things like that. The world is a much better place than people make it sound. That’s another book record recommendation, Factfulness by Hans Rosling. Go read that book-

Stephanie:

Factfulness.

Andrew:

… it will help you look at the world totally different. Factfulness. Forget my other book my other book and finish reading that one.

Stephanie:

I’ll link of that one. Yeah, no, I think that’s where I would bet too because I think I just read that, it’s a billion and a half people there only a third of them, I think have cell phones right now. They’re coming online at a very quick rate. So, I think-

Andrew:

Yeah. I mean, it’s incredible how much better life has gotten in the world for so many people. There’s very hard life in the world for a lot of people, so to not to underplay that. But it’s just crazy and it’s going to keep happening.

Stephanie:

Yeah, I agree. What’s up next in your travel destinations?

Andrew:

Anywhere-

Stephanie:

When you can travel. I think, just outside my neighborhood.

Andrew:

Yeah. I like Austin, Minnesota where my family is, hopefully in a couple of weeks, but we’ll see. As far as other places, I love Boston. Would like to go with my wife there. I have a seven month old though, so the actual answer to this question is probably nowhere for a while.

Stephanie:

Yeah. That’s my life too. I have four month old twin boys and a two year old. Someone asked me like, “Oh, where are you going to go on vacation?” I’m like, “Nowhere outside of 10 miles away.” It’s a mess to get into the car that would be-

Andrew:

Four-year-old twin boys?

Stephanie:

Yeah, yeah.

Andrew:

I think it’s awesome. Congratulations. That’s beautiful.

Stephanie:

Thanks. Yeah, it’s a wild ride. All right, the last one … Yeah, you know. What’s up next on your Netflix queue?

Andrew:

I just watch the same shows over and over again with my wife.

Stephanie:

Does she get to choose?

Andrew:

She does most times, yeah.

Stephanie:

So you guys are watching Selling Sunset and things like that?

Andrew:

No. We watched Parks and Rec, 30 Rock and The Good Place-

Stephanie:

Okay, those are very ones.

Andrew:

… over and over and over again. That’s probably all we watch. I don’t know. The decision fatigue I have on this particular issues, we just created a Slack channel that worked for media recommendations because I just don’t know even what to do anymore about where to look next. So, I wish I had a better answer than that. It would-

Stephanie:

Let us know if you find something from your Slack channel.

Andrew:

Yeah. It’s probably another episode of The Good place. My team is really hot on Yellowstone right now, so there you go.

Stephanie:

Okay. I don’t know what that is, that just shows I am not with it either. So I’ll have to check that out.

Andrew:

Kevin Costner intense ranching family season three.

Stephanie:

Okay. I’ll have to dive into that one. All right, that was a good lightning round. Is there anything that you were hoping to cover, are there any last words of advice before we hop off?

Andrew:

I think just that in situations like this, I always just want to say that when somebody asks you for answers on a podcast, it’s super easy to make it sound easy in some ways. But it’s really hard actually to do these things and to grow business and to work in a team and all these things. So, I think the parting word for me is always just to say, it’s not actually as easy as it maybe. I hope I didn’t make it sound like that. It’s just challenging at times. So, keep at it and surround herself with good people. Yeah, I think that’s it. I think I just properly took all the wind out of the point that I was making by monitoring it at the end there. Maybe out of [inaudible 01:02:52]. That’s the big piece for me, is just you can do it, it is harder than it sounds a lot of times.

Stephanie:

Yeah, I like it. Well, Andrew, thanks so much for coming on the show. It was a lot of fun and … Yeah, thanks for taking the time.

Andrew:

Thanks, Stephanie, for having me. It’s super fun.

 

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